Forty Eight States

candace-gaudiani-2467 Candice Plummer Gaudiani’s Forty Eight States small case set will be featured in a three-person show at the Griffin Museum, Winchester, MA, selected by curator Paula Tognarelli. “Under Glass” June 13-July 13.

Gaudiani is one of 28 artists out of 900 selected for the Portland (Maine) Museum of Art’s Biennial “Piece Work”, chosen by Jessica May, Curator for Contemporary and Modern Art. Only 5 photographers were selected. Her book Between Destinations will be featured in the bookstore during the Biennial and her small case set will be installed in a custom wall vitrine and 6 pieces from Forty Eight States II will be exhibited, both in the final corridor of the exhibition, as punctuation for the show. Please join her for the openings October 1 and 2. View the exhibit through January 5.

ArtPadSF

Electric Works is pleased to be featuring in our gallery/room for ArtPadSF at the Phoenix Hotel the work of Robert Minervini and Dave Eggers. Elaine Buckholtz will be creating an on-site light installation. 

Robert Minervini will be addressing the kind of subject matter that is alluded to in his previous utopian and dystopian cityscapes, landscapes, and floral still life paintings—namely, the ecological impact of humanity on the landscape. His new paintings and drawings of floral still lifes, literal and metaphorical quotations from traditional European vanitas paintings have been recontextualized in contemporary environments. The flora and fauna depicted in these works are currently listed as endangered wildlife in California. These present day memento mori directly reference the traditional form and function of European vanitas paintings—which acted as symbolic reminders of the inevitability of death—by depicting local wildlife that is in the process of extinction. His presence at ArtPadSF will be an extension of his show After Glow: As the Wick Burns that is in our gallery, May 10- June 29. 
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Dave Eggers will present animal portraits with text- china marker on paper with words that express what the animal might be thinking. Working in the vernacular of political propaganda posters, these deftly executed drawings feature an ongoing cast of fur-, feather-, and scale-bearing creatures. What seems like an extraordinary balancing act of good humor and earnest pledges of allegiance, Eggers creates a menagerie that speaks to our very human condition.

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Elaine Buckholtz will be creating a lavender light installation onto the swimming pool in the center courtyard of the hotel and she will be changing out all the lights on the landings of each room to a soft pink. Buckholtz explores light as an ephemeral phenomenon and uses it to unmask hidden aspects of architectural forms in relation to painting. She uses visual and temporal repetition to explore the intersection of space, image, movement, and light. Her fascination with light has a long history. Buckholtz will use her background in lighting and theater design to generate her own luminous theater at the Phoenix Hotel.

Easy Rider

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Electric Works’ artist Elaine Buckholtz’s will present Easy Rider a site-specific, light-based work at ArtPadSF 2013. Buckholtz, known for her colorful and subtle interactions with video, print and sound, will change the atmosphere of the fair with this poetic, playful and just-barely-present work. In Easy Rider the Phoenix Hotel’s usual outdoor lighting in front of each gallery room is replaced with a soft pink light bulb. Lavender light projected from above the pool hits the water at an angle that activates both its surface and depths. The lit swimming pool creates a center point of the Phoenix’s outdoor space and the gauzy ambient light.

ArtPadSF at the iconic Phoenix Hotel is a provocative 21st century boutique art fair, focused on emerging and contemporary art from the Bay Area and beyond. In its third year and partnered with San Francisco’s world-renowned arts institutions, galleries, and artists, ArtPadSF is a crossroads for the creative and an unparalleled marketplace for art. Arts patrons and enthusiasts are invited to take in some of the most exciting contemporary art the market has to offer as the Phoenix Hotel transforms itself into a visual arts destination with over 40 hotel rooms being taken over by galleries and curatorial projects. Join us May 16th through 19th 2013 for screenings, panels, performances, and more.

OPENING NIGHT TICKETS

GENERAL ADMISSION TICKETS

After Glow: As the Wick Burns

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Robert Minervini
After Glow: As the Wick Burns
May 10—June 29

Artist Reception, Friday, May 10, 6-8 PM

In After Glow: As the Wick Burns Robert Minervini addresses the ecological impact of humanity on the landscape. In a group of thirteen new paintings and drawings of floral still lifes, literal and metaphorical quotations from traditional European vanitas paintings have been recontextualized in contemporary environments. The flora and fauna depicted in these works are currently listed as endangered wildlife in California. These present day memento mori directly reference the traditional form and function of vanitas paintings—which acted as symbolic reminders of the inevitability of death—by depicting local wildlife that is in the process of extinction.

The subtitle “As the Wick Burns” is a poetic adaptation of a familial saying which Minervini would use whenever preparing to depart from family gatherings. In Molfetesse, Minervini’s family’s regional language, the expression “Sa squagghiate la cer” roughly translates as “the candle wick is about to burn out,” meaning our time together is coming to an end. Minervini often found this saying to be bittersweet, and it echoes the notion of time fleeting presented in his work.

Ranging in scale from intimate to grand, and in style from abstract to realistic, these highly meticulous and layered artworks vacillate in a space that is both symbolic and illusionistic. Using predominantly acrylic paint, and mixed media such as paper and cellophane, the materiality and physicality of these works in close proximity is contradictory to the slick appearance that they take on at a distance. At moments, paint skins scraped up from the palette are collaged into and on top of layers to create flower forms. In contrast, highly rendered moments intermingle with swatches of spray-painted forms and shapes to create a visual weaving and density that mimics the effect of looking into an elaborate bouquet of flowers.

The flowers in these works have been chosen for their symbolism of aesthetic beauty and the way in which they simultaneously signify ecological disaster in a specific time and place. Through this body of work, Minervini poses the question: What is the greater cultural significance of depicting something that is both beautiful and a sign of something profoundly tragic?